Why you shouldn't focus on the deliverable, but on what's realizable

March 22, 2018 — Posted by Al Shalloway

Most Agile approaches focus on the deliverable. At Net Objectives we believe that this sets up the common challenge many companies have of getting getting those last bits done in order to get true value to customers. Those last few inches seem to take the longest to get done. I’m not talking about final testing, but rather getting support, marketing, ops and others on board.

This is not a coincidence. In fact, I suggest it is the focus on the deliverable that often causes this. Getting something on a company’s servers provides no value to the customer (or the business except for perhaps feedback). It has to be used. It has to provide value.

This is why Net Objectives suggests focusing on the realization of business value. By thinking about realization instead of the deliverable, we naturally consider all the parties required to contribute to value realization. And, of course, the deliverable is part of this. This also has product management ask– “what part of this deliverable can I realize value from fastest?” This is the use of minimum business increments (MBI) & the MBI Mindset.

The goal is business agility - the quick realization of business value predictably, sustainably and with high quality.

 

If you're looking for help for your Scrum teams please drop me a line.

Al Shalloway

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About the author | Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway is the founder and CEO of Net Objectives. With 45 years of experience, Al is an industry thought leader in Lean, Kanban, product portfolio management, Scrum and agile design. He helps companies transition to Lean and Agile methods enterprise-wide as well teaches courses in these areas.



        

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