Why There Is No One Size Fits All Framework But There Are One Size Fits All Technical Practices

May 17, 2018 — Posted by Al Shalloway

Most of my recent posts have been about first teaching the actual way of doing Agile (e.g., ATDD) with only a little about the frameworks. My claim is how to follow the framework will then be easier. The reason for this is in the nature of the generalization of frameworks vs the generalization of good techincal practices.

Frameworks address particular challenges. But the workflow to be used depends upon several factors:

  1. what capabilities are present in the organization
  2. culture
  3. organizational structure
  4. type of software being written (e.g., business, compiler)
  5. & others

Clearly what the challenge is & what the solutions are vary. It's nice to think it'll all be solved if people would just create a cross-functional team & follow a few ceremonies, but reality tells us otherwise.

Here's the thing. Some technical practices are virtually always better. Everywhere. For example, thinking about how you'll test your code before writing your code. Encapsulating varying behavior. Avoiding redundancy. & quite a few others. Since these are the immutable practices we should learn how to do them first. What "framework" will support them will naturally become clear.

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About the author | Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway is the founder and CEO of Net Objectives. With 45 years of experience, Al is an industry thought leader in Lean, Kanban, product portfolio management, Scrum and agile design. He helps companies transition to Lean and Agile methods enterprise-wide as well teaches courses in these areas.



        

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