Why Certification may be causing Things to Be Difficult To Master

March 21, 2018 — Posted by Al Shalloway

I believe Scrum being "easy to understand but difficult to master" (from the Scrum guide) & Scrum.org/inc/alliance's focus on certification are related. I also assert (have evidence) it doesn't have to be difficult to master. I suggest that there is a causality between certification & the difficulty to master Scrum.

In the first case, people are learning Scrum as defined in the Scrum guide with a generic way of applying it. Epics, features, user stories, "as a ..." story writing, ... This is teaching Scrum in a manner that can apply to any place & is often focused on the ScrumMaster role. The approach is followed by certifying bodies because tests require a simple standard. However, this lack of specificity leaves teams w/the need to figure out the details themselves-or to hire a coach. The first doesn't work well & the second is expensive.

A better way is to teach Scrum for the team with product owners being present. It also needs to focus on the teams' actual context & use their requirements to teach Agile Requirements. While this is not hard for experienced trainers, it's not possible to provide certification for it because the tailoring required will make testing impossible. It also is not possible to sell it as a public course

 

If you're looking for help for your Scrum teams please drop me a line.

Al Shalloway

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About the author | Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway is the founder and CEO of Net Objectives. With 45 years of experience, Al is an industry thought leader in Lean, Kanban, product portfolio management, Scrum and agile design. He helps companies transition to Lean and Agile methods enterprise-wide as well teaches courses in these areas.



        

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