What Makes Experienced Developers "Experienced"

March 23, 2018 — Posted by Al Shalloway

We often hear people saying they do something because “experience tells me to.” But that doesn’t really say anything. I once heard someone say “scientists answer the question ‘why do birds fly south for the winter’ with ‘instinct’ because even though that doesn’t tell you anything, it sounds better than ‘I don’t know.’” 

What makes a difference for great developers is what they’ve gained from their experience.

I would suggest these include:

  • What to attend to
  • What to ignore
  • To know what are good trends and what are bad trends, that is, be able to tell where initial actions will take them
  • Several good practices

Examples of these are:

  • Attend to code quality – coupling, cohesion, no redundancy, testability, encapsulation
  • What to ignore – worrying about how simple to make things
  • Good trend – when code is readily changeable
  • Bad trend – when any of the qualities start going down
  • Good practices – programming by intention, separate use from construction, consider how you will test your code before writing it
  • It is important to learn from your code. See what works. See what doesn't. Ask why you put bugs in your code when you do (gremlins are not doing it to you :) ).

If you're looking for help for your Scrum teams please drop me a line.

Al Shalloway

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About the author | Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway is the founder and CEO of Net Objectives. With 45 years of experience, Al is an industry thought leader in Lean, Kanban, product portfolio management, Scrum and agile design. He helps companies transition to Lean and Agile methods enterprise-wide as well teaches courses in these areas.



        

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