Scrum is simple & easy. What to look for when it's hard

March 18, 2018 — Posted by Al Shalloway

I hear-Scrum is simple to understand, difficult to master. Of course, most anything’s difficult to master. But I think they’d agree w/it’s difficult to use effectively. The problem w/ this statement is that it’s not accurate-I’ve seen teams become effective almost immediately w/Scrum

Scrum’s being difficult's often due to the following:

  1. Essential practices that most people don’t know & won’t reinvent are not taught in most Scrum trainings
  2. Management doesn’t buy into Scrum cuz they don’t understand what’s in it for them-the history of chicken calling hasn’t helped
  3. Teams are told to just follow Scrum & don’t understand what’s in it for them
  4. Some adjustments to Scrum’s framework are needed but people are told “Scrum is simple, follow it as is”
  5. Scrum was designed for early adopters but it’s now being used by late adopters

The above challenges can be alleviated:

  1. Include required practices
  2. Explain management’s role
  3. Avoid dogma & provide people with underlying principles as needed
  4. Adjust what cross-functionality means & manage those not on the team w/ Kanban
  5. Don’t use Scrum where it wasn’t designed for

Learn more at

http://bit.ly/2pbvbuG Scrum as Example

http://bit.ly/2DqozxK how to teach Scrum

 

If you're looking for help for your Scrum teams please drop me a line.

Al Shalloway

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About the author | Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway is the founder and CEO of Net Objectives. With 45 years of experience, Al is an industry thought leader in Lean, Kanban, product portfolio management, Scrum and agile design. He helps companies transition to Lean and Agile methods enterprise-wide as well teaches courses in these areas.



        

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