Scrum should be specialized for software development/IT teams

July 6, 2018 — Posted by Al Shalloway
Software is not the same as the physical world. While work in the physical world is often visible, in the software world it often isn’t. Consider how you can see what’s being built in the physical world, but in the software world, writing bugs or good code looks the same.
 
On the other hand, the software world has some advantage. For example, you can design software on top of a foundation that is readily changeable. You can also build a piece of software and start using it while in the physical world we often have to create prototypes to see what it will look like. It also takes more time to move from one task to another in the physical. Once you start to think about it, there are quite a few other differences.
 
Having a framework that is specialized for software can be designed to fill in what the physical world automatically provides for us but the software world doesn’t. It also allows for us to create value faster than would be possible in the physical world.
 
It also allows for training that is specific to those attending it. Scrum taught as a general framework is often considered to abstract and theoretically. People like to know what they need to do for their situation.
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About the author | Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway is the founder and CEO of Net Objectives. With 45 years of experience, Al is an industry thought leader in Lean, Kanban, product portfolio management, Scrum and agile design. He helps companies transition to Lean and Agile methods enterprise-wide as well teaches courses in these areas.



        

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