Discovering Problems Is Not Enough, You Must Know What to Do

May 24, 2018 — Posted by Al Shalloway
The above is a paraphrase of Edwards Deming-often called “The American Who Taught Quality to the Japanese” Deming had a great impact on Honda & Toyota – the companies Takeuchi & Nonaka were studying when they wrote “The New New Product Development Game” which inspired Scrum.
 
The SG tells us that “Scrum makes clear the relative efficacy of your product management and work techniques so that you can continuously improve the product, the team, & the working environment.” Essentially, we operate in a controlled failure mode- finding what’s impeding our delivery of value and removing it.
 
Scrum, however, is based on 2 assumptions. 1st, that this is the best way to discover our “efficacy” & 2nd that people will figure out how to improve it. For Scrum’s 1st 10-15 yrs the 1st assumption may have been true. But with the emergence of lean for software it no longer is. As far as the 2nd, there is much evidence that people won’t figure it out. But even if they could, why would you want them to reinvent the wheel? There're many SW dev practices, in particular ATDD &TDD that developers should know & be using.
 
This is why we embed core Agile practices in all team training we do while providing a support system for the other roles.
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About the author | Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway is the founder and CEO of Net Objectives. With 45 years of experience, Al is an industry thought leader in Lean, Kanban, product portfolio management, Scrum and agile design. He helps companies transition to Lean and Agile methods enterprise-wide as well teaches courses in these areas.



        

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