Day 7 of 100 Emergent Design

April 30, 2013 — Posted by Al Shalloway

Continuing with the  100 Things You Must Know to Be Effective In Software Development.

I appreciate the comments I've been receiving on this project. While I am not changing the title as yet, I believe it would be more appropriately named: "The 60 things you need to know, the 10 things you need to forget and 10 other useful things to be effective in software development."  A bit long, I know.

Today I want to talk about technical issues. Many people wonder how they can go to Agile. The two biggest concerns are that Agile will have us design ourselves into a corner and that without high tech debt, we need to make changes in large batches so as to enable testing.  I'll start with the second concern first: Going Agile is not causing this problem, going Agile is exposing it.  If you keep adding to your technical debt and don't automate your testing your software will eventually die! True, one must be intelligent about any transition.  But ignoring the need for the transition can be deadly.

As far as designing yourself into a corner that can be avoided with the use of emergent design.  It is unfortunate that when Agile first rose in popularity, many technical thought leaders talked about design being dead.  This has since been recanted, but the idea that we can just do the simplest possible thing and proceed without fear remains in the minds of many.  Emergent design is about how to only build what you need now while preparing for changing your design when new requirements demand it.

Here's a Primer on Emergent Design, a short blog I wrote recently that describes what you need to know.

Al Shalloway
CEO, Net Objectives

Take the 100 in 100 Challenge. I'm committing to add one entry each day.  I'm asking people to accept the challenge of reading them.  If you accept this challenge, please enter a comment on the blog that started it all and tell me why you are taking up the challenge - that is, what you'd like to learn.

 

 

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About the author | Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway is the founder and CEO of Net Objectives. With 45 years of experience, Al is an industry thought leader in Lean, Kanban, product portfolio management, Scrum and agile design. He helps companies transition to Lean and Agile methods enterprise-wide as well teaches courses in these areas.



        

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