Complexity Does Not Mean We Don't Know What To Try

May 30, 2018 — Posted by Al Shalloway
Software development is complex. This means that we can't just make a plan & expect it to work. Knowing this shifts how leaders/managers need to behave. Their job becomes more about creating vision & alignment & providing the right environment for the people doing the work. 
 
But consider for a moment that even in complex systems there is a degree of predictability. What would happen if teams were demanded to work on twice the number of projects? What if you were required to spend time making estimates far in advance? What if you were told you'd be fired if you didn't get something done on time? While there might be variations, we know they'd all be bad. 
 
This gives us a clue. Some things are predictably bad. Many organizations are doing predictably bad things. We can gain some degree of predictability by removing the bad. 
 
The patterns of "bad" are fairly well known. Scrum Masters should not have to figure this out any more. While you may not know exactly what will work, you can know what to try.
 
This is why we (Net Objectives) has built a support system for Scrum. You don't need to reinvent the wheel.
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About the author | Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway is the founder and CEO of Net Objectives. With 45 years of experience, Al is an industry thought leader in Lean, Kanban, product portfolio management, Scrum and agile design. He helps companies transition to Lean and Agile methods enterprise-wide as well teaches courses in these areas.



        

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