A Big Difference Between Scrum and Lean

March 21, 2018 — Posted by Al Shalloway

This was a response to a comment in my earlier post (scroll down to see) but thought it worth it's own linkedin post. The comment was perhaps we need better people. The reality, we do if "better" means more skilled. The need for devs continues to outstrip supply. Anyway, my response:

i believe we have good people without the skills they need. Agile in general, and Scrum in particular puts it on the people to figure things out while they self-organize. This unfortunately, often does not happen. This is the biggest difference between scrum and lean. Scrum is a black box process (according to the Scrum guide). It doesn't believe in having a model underneath it that explains the laws of why it works (it's stated to be empirical). You inspect and adapt according to what happens but don't continuously improve the model. If you try that you are considered a heretic and thrown out of the community (happened to me twice btw). And then I finally walked away myself.

Lean, on the other hand, believes in continuously building a model of what's happening and continuously testing it against experience and modifying it. Understanding is paramount.. While my co teaches Scrum from a practices point of view, we teach it w/ the Lean perspective. It's much more effective this way.

 

If you're looking for help for your Scrum teams please drop me a line.

Al Shalloway

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About the author | Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway is the founder and CEO of Net Objectives. With 45 years of experience, Al is an industry thought leader in Lean, Kanban, product portfolio management, Scrum and agile design. He helps companies transition to Lean and Agile methods enterprise-wide as well teaches courses in these areas.



        

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