3 questions about Scrum

April 3, 2018 — Posted by Al Shalloway

I just asked this on Scrum Practitioners group but thought I'd ask them here as well.

I've been doing Scrum for almost twenty years, Kanban for a decade and Lean for 15 years.

#1

The fact that Scrum is a simple, lightweight framework is always assumed to be a good thing. When training a team doing software development, why not start out with more in it and have a framework designed for software developers?

#2

Scrum has immutable roles, events, artifacts, and rules. This is necessary because Scrum does not present a model for deciding how to modify these things and therefore requires absolute following of them. Why is this always considered a good idea instead of providing a way to see which of two practices would be better to meet an objective?

#3

It is often mentioned that Scrum is based on an empirical process and stated in such a way that this is a good thing. Why is that? While software development is empirical, the process on which we work on it doesn’t have to be.

 

Thanks.

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About the author | Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway is the founder and CEO of Net Objectives. With 45 years of experience, Al is an industry thought leader in Lean, Kanban, product portfolio management, Scrum and agile design. He helps companies transition to Lean and Agile methods enterprise-wide as well teaches courses in these areas.



        

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