Effective Agile At Scale Webinar Series

Effective Agile At Scale Webinar Series: Achieving Enterprise Agility®

Net Objectives has teamed with AgileCraft and LeanKit as sponsors for this webinar series.

AgileCraft
LeanKit

This webinar series has a different format than previous ones. The sessions will be shorter, typically 20-30 minutes in length with 10-15 minutes of Q&A. But some will be live and some will be pre-recorded with live Q&A sessions. In addition, this really two series in parallel. One set of sessions is generic, and should be of interest to everyone regardless of approach they are taking. The second set if geared towards those either doing or considering doing the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe).

General Sessions:

  1. An Executive’s Guide to Agile
  2. Why Achieving Agile at Scale Requires More Than Team & Evolutionary-based Approaches
  3. What Is Required at Scale?
  4. The Value of Teams
  5. Using Cadence, Synchronization and Shared Backlogs to Manage Multiple Teams
  6. Managing Multiple Stakeholders & Multiple Teams: The Need for the Product Manager
  7. Agile Architecture at Scale (this is same as SAFe/Agile Architecture below)

SAFeTM Sessions:

  1. Keeping SAFe Agile: The Lean-Agile Framework
  2. An Executive's Introduction to SAFe
  3. A Technology Director’s Introduction to SAFe
  4. How SAFe Manifests Scale
  5. Transitioning to SAFe: Before, During and After
  6. SAFe/Agile Architecture

General Sessions:

Date|Time|Presenter|Recording Title|Description
Recording
Given April 22, 2014, Tuesday
9am-10am PDT

Al Shalloway
1 PDU Category B
1. An Executive’s Guide to Agile. Discusses Net Objectives’ approach to Agile, which is about fast delivery of business value in a predictable, repeatable manner. If you are an executive or you’ve talked to executives about Agile and got little interest from them, this webinar is designed for you. Agile is really about the quick delivery of the most important business value in a consistent, repeatable, predictable manner. It is not about iterations, teams, co-location, or any of the ways it may be implemented.

This talk describes Agile from a business perspective and explains how you must drive your approach to Agile to be most effective. We call it business driven software development. It involves identifying the most important value to deliver, how to allocate your capacity to deliver it.

Intended audience: Executives, business stakeholder, directors

 

We apologize that the Recording failed. We will try to re-record (TBD)
Slides PDF
Given May 28, 2014, Wednesday
9am-10am PDT

Al Shalloway
1 PDU Category B
2. Why Achieving Agile at Scale Requires More Than Team & Evolutionary-based Approaches. Achieving Agile at scale requires attending to structure, management, systems, code quality and more. Approaches geared from a top up or kaizen only approach are doomed to fail because they don’t address inherent challenges of Agile at scale. This webinar starts out by discussing these challenges and describes why systems thinking and attending to flow are essential. Before we embark on a transition to Lean-Agile methods, we must understand the challenges inherent in effective software development of either products or IT software.
  • Why our management methods work against our ability to develop software
  • Our required mindset – lean-flow
  • How to create visibility in our process and what we will discover
  • Why pilots tend to work, but often take us further from Agile at scale
  • Why a team based approach cannot solve an organization’s problem – time to move on from Scrum-of-Scrums

Intended audience: Directors, architects, product managers, product owners, project managers, team leads

Recording
Slides PDF
Given June 23, 2014, Monday

9am-10am PDT
Al Shalloway
1 PDU Category B

3. What is Required at Scale? Software development requires several things to be done to be effective and efficient. While these may not have been well-known 10 years ago, they are fairly well known now and include:
Business Level

  • Focus on building and deploying minimal business increments
  • Drive from business value, organize around what is being built and build incrementally
  • Have architectural epics be a peer to business epics
  • Limit the number of things being worked on

Management

  • Make all work visible
  • Have teams work in a consistent cadence to be able to synchronize on a frequent basis
  • Value code quality, program execution, alignment and transparency
  • Provide a structure for teams to work together
  • Create teams to the greatest extent possible

Teams

  • Manage work in process to eliminate waste caused by delays and overworked people
  • Have an owner for the development value stream
  • Use test-first methods
  • Automate testing
  • Achieve continuous integration

Intended audience: Directors, Executives, Project Managers, ScrumMasters, Team Leads, Architects

TBA
Al Shalloway
1 PDU Category B

4. The Value of Teams. The cross-functional team is a cornerstone of Scrum. Unfortunately, at scale, cross-functional teams are often either not achievable or advisable. Kanban growth in popularity has partly been accelerated by it being able to work when cross-functional teams did not exist. But we must not lose sight of the power of teams. This session discusses:

  • How cross-functional teams eliminate waste
  • The structure of teams can and should be mandated at times – case study
  • Dynamic feature teams case study
  • Creating Teams When You Don’t Think It Possible

Intended for: Directors, Project Managers, ScrumMasters, Team Leads

TBA
Al Shalloway
1 PDU Category B

5. Using Cadence, Synchronization and Shared Backlogs to Manage Multiple Teams. Coordinating multiple teams requires a bigger view than the peer-to-peer approach of Scrum of Scrums. This session discusses different ways multiple teams can work together. It includes:

  • The importance of cadence across teams
  • How this helps integration across teams
  • How to use shared backlogs to deliver faster when multiple teams are involved
  • Intended for: Directors, Project Managers, ScrumMasters, Team Leads

Intended for: Directors, Product Managers, Product Owners, Project Managers, ScrumMasters, Team Leads

TBA
Al Shalloway
1 PDU Category B

6. Managing Multiple Stakeholders & Multiple Teams: The Need for the Product Manager. The product owner role than many Agile organizations purports to translate requirements from the stakeholder to the team. In organizations with a development organization of larger than 2-300 people, this role is insufficient for several reasons. This session shows:

  • The need for the product manager
  • How to manage work from business stakeholder to product manager to product owner to teams
  • The different methods of synchronizing work
  • Have cross-functional teams for everything coming in
  • Create teams that pull based on top priority
  • Start only when have capacity
  • MBIs, features, stories are sequenced in tandem

Intended for: Directors, Product Managers, Product Owners, Project Managers, ScrumMasters, Team Leads

TBA
Al Shalloway
1-5 PDUs Category B
7. Agile Architecture at Scale (this is same as SAFe/Agile Architecture below)

Parallel SAFeTM Sessions:

These are sessions that will be scheduled mid-series as we proceed.

Date|Time|Presenter|Recording Title|Description
Register
November 3, 2014, Monday
9am-10am PST

Al Shalloway
1 PDU Category B
1. Keeping SAFe Agile: The Lean-Agile Framework. Many in the Agile community are blasting SAFe as a heavy weight process. Unfortunately, SAFe is often implemented as a heavy process because people take what they learn from the standard courses and apply it by rote. However, SAFe does not need to be heavy at all. But to make it lightweight, one must differentiate between the framework part of SAFe and the practices within that framework. We call this framework the Lean-Agile Framework and it should be the core of a SAFe implementation. The essence of SAFe’s framework is:
  • Prioritizing work across the portfolio and organizing it to be implemented efficiently across a program by coordinating teams
  • Managing the amount of work in process at all of these levels
  • Making all work visible
  • Following Lean Management principles
  • Pushing decisions down as far as possible in the organizational hierarchy
  • Attending to the entire value stream with appropriate team structures and roles

The main practices of SAFe include:

  • Scrum at the team level
  • 10-14 week release plans done over 2 days done by all of the people in the release train
  • Identification of dependencies and risks over this time period during the planning event
  • Having architectural epics be managed by an enterprise architect to create an overall view

This talk discusses how the benefits of SAFe’s holistic framework (which is not heavy) can be combined with lightweight practices other than those needed when the organization is large. This approach both improves implementations of SAFe where it is required and allowing for SAFe to provide guidance where it’s practices are heavier than the situation demands.

TBA
Al Shalloway
1 PDU Category B
2. An Executive's Introduction to SAFe.This session presents SAFe from an executive’s perspective. 
  • The 30 minute introduction to SAFe, oriented toward the Business.
  • How SAFe addresses Business concerns

Intended for: Executives, Directors, Product Managers, Product Owners, Project Managers, ScrumMasters, Team Leads

TBA
Al Shalloway
1 PDU Category B
3. A Technology Director’s Introduction to SAFe. This session presents SAFe from a technology director’s point of view. It covers:
  • The Portfolio, Program, Team structure of SAFe
  • Defining an Agile Release Train
  • Planning and managing releases
  • How teams work together

Intended audience: Directors, architects, product managers, product owners, project managers, team leads

TBA
Al Shalloway
1 PDU Category B
4. How SAFe Manifests Scale. SAFe works because it provides a framework for manifesting structure and behavior that must be present to have Agile at scale. This session illustrates how SAFe does that. In particular, it covers:
  • SAFe at the business level
  • SAFe at the program level
  • How teams work in cadence to allow for frequent integration
  • How SAFe attends to architectural and code quality
  • When SAFe is applicable to an organization

Intended audience: Directors, architects, product managers, product owners, project managers, team leads

TBA
Al Shalloway
1 PDU Category B
5. Transitioning to SAFe: Before, During, After. This session presents how to plan for a transition to SAFe, what to expect while you are in it and how you sustain it
  • Planning to start SAFe
    • The SAFe Quickstart
    • Alternative Methods
  • Your first release planning event
  • Staying on track during your first release cycle
  • How to inspect and adapt in preparation for your next release planning event
  • Ongoing improvement within SAFe

Intended audience: Directors, architects, RTEs, product managers, product owners, project managers, team leads

TBA
Al Shalloway
1 PDU Category B
6. SAFe/ Agile Architecture. This presents SAFe architectural principles. While the cornerstone of SAFe architecture, these are useful for any large scale Agile architecture. These are:
  • Design Emerges
  • The Architectural Runway
  • The Value of Simple Architectures
  • The Value of Spikes
  • Build and Test Together
  • Everyone innovates
  • Implement Architectural Flow
  • Intended audience: All interested people with a technical background