Where You Come From Can Make the Going Easy or Hard

October 28, 2015 — Posted by Al Shalloway

Agile at scale. What does it mean?

To many it means start with a team and scale up. This is a bottom up approach. A team centric approach. It comes from a value of the team being paramount.

Not surprisingly, these same people often encounter resistance by management, by executives, and by business sponsors.  And wonder why.  I'd be surprised if they didn't get resistance.

Management, executives and business sponsors are concerned with their product development and IT groups delivering value to their customers and their business. 

Maybe they care about their teams, maybe they don't, but that's a different topic than what the teams do. 

The reality is I've seen teams have highest morale when they deliver value.  Real business value that delights customers.  Nothing gets developers more excited than that.

Focus on the value.  Start with the front of the value stream - "what do our customers actually need?  Which things are most important? How can we align ourselves to deliver that in a predictable, sustainable manner with high quality?"

Thinking this way will not only align with the laws of software development (Lean) but it will also align with the values of everyone in the organization.  By doing that, you might be able to align the actions of everybody in the organization.

Agile values tell us to value each other, trust each other.  Teams should not just value their perspective but must own the perspective of the organization.

Al Shalloway
CEO, Net Objectives

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About the author | Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway is the founder and CEO of Net Objectives. With over 40 years of experience, Alan is an industry thought leader in Lean, Kanban, product portfolio management, SAFe, Scrum and agile design.



        

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