Scaled Distractions

November 7, 2017 — Posted by Guy Beaver

Instead of reacting...choose to respond.

At a personal level, you need calm focus to recognize distractions. Without this awareness, reactions can dominate choices and take you away from goals. If instead you have the space in your busy mind to observe when you are reacting, you can choose when and what an appropriate response is and stay focused on your higher priority goals.

Notice the scaled version of this. An enterprise needs an operating model to turn organizational reaction into a prioritized response. An effective model includes frequent activities to prioritize by sequencing organizational tasks into visible queues. 

If you have multiple priorities, you have none, so bringing organizational awareness to ordered sequences is critical, and an operational model is required to make this activity visible and frequent (example here).

Larry Janesky, CEO of Basement Systems Inc. points out that reactive and creative have the same letters, just in different positions, and notes that Reactive gets in the way of Creative

Reaction is a distraction. Creative means innovative, whereas reactive means distracted.

You are the leader. Is your organization innovating or reacting? How do you know?

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About the author | Guy Beaver

Guy Beaver is VP of Enterprise Engagements and a Senior Consultant. He is a seasoned technology executive known for building Lean organizations that are driven by business priorities. With 30+ years experience in Financial Services, Aerospace, Health Care and eCommerce, his technology accomplishments include managing enterprise web development and delivery for world class transaction systems (16 Million users), large data center transitions, and SaaS operational excellence utilizing Lean IT practices. He is skilled at organizational change and is the co-author of Lean-Agile Software Development: Achieving Enterprise Agility.



        

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