Outline of Lean Seminar

November 16, 2013 — Posted by Al Shalloway

I am doing a Lean seminar on Monday and was outlining it before committing it to PowerPoint.  Thought folks might find this useful.

What if you could get what you wanted but you couldn’t get it by going directly after what you wanted?

What do we want? Value delivered quickly, efficiently, predictably and sustainably.  To achieve this, it like we need:

  • Low cost
  • High productivity
  • High quality
  • Predictability

But going after those doesn’t appear to work:

  • Going after low cost by cutting costs often leads to higher costs
  • Going after productivity by tracking what people work on tends to have people be overworked
  • Going after high quality often leads to a focus on testing in quality, not producing methods that create quality
  • Planning in unstable environments or on events that have a significant amount of uncertainty rarely work

Is there another way?

Lean suggests improve your systems by:

  • Focusing on what is most needed
  • Removing delays in workflow
  • Shortening feedback cycles
  • Avoiding duplication of effort
  • Increasing collaboration & learning
  • Using some sort of test-first method in discovering and building what you need

We do this by attending to our systems and striving to continuously improving them.

Challenge – we manage in an hierarchical fashion, but our work flows across the hierarchy. No one manages this value stream - few, if any, even see it. See Why Seeing the Value Stream is So Important (a 7 minute video).

We must create visibility (use value streams).

Eliminate waste.  Waste comes from:

  • Building less important items – not using Minimum Business Increments (MBIs)
  • Rebuilding items due to slow feedback – from customer, on how our building is going (building right thing, building it correctly)
  • Delays in the workflow
  • Re-learning
  • Duplicate effort

By eliminating we, we eliminate the unscheduled/unplanned work we create mostly with workflow and feedback delays.  By eliminating this work, we create greater predictability in what we have to do.  Our efficiency goes up because we are working on truly useful things.  Our sustainability goes up because people are not as burdened. Our value delivery speeds up because we have both eliminated the workflow delays and the time we had to spend on the work they created.  Our quality goes up because our understanding of what we need is better and our solutions are less complicated than they would be otherwise.  Our test-first approaches also allow us to build the solution with fewer errors and provides us with a way to learn how to improve quality as well.


Al Shalloway

 

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About the author | Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway is the founder and CEO of Net Objectives. With over 40 years of experience, Alan is an industry thought leader in Lean, Kanban, product portfolio management, SAFe, Scrum and agile design.



        

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