The Minimum Business Increments of Learning Agile

May 14, 2018 — Posted by Al Shalloway
One of the biggest missing pieces of Agile is the idea of the minimum increment of value that the customer can realize. We call these minimum business increment (MBI). Note I said "realized" not merely deployed. This thinking should be used in teach Scrum as well. We shouldn't be teaching as much as we can deliver, but as much as the clients can realize.
Just teach Scrum or SAFe for Teams focuses has much "deliverable" which not all of which is realized. 
 
I would suggest that the order of importance of MBIs for Agile teams is:
  1.  lean-principle of flow
  2.  why feedback is essential & must be used
  3.  why acceptance criteria is so important
  4.  how to create acceptance criteria & get quick feedback
  5.  what process you'll use to support your Agile work
  6.  how the team will work with each other
  7.  how whatever you are adopting will support the team in doing this
 
This requires about 1/6 on principles, 1/2 on doing Agile, 1/3 on the framework/method you are adopting. 
 
If you take training that focuses on the framework being used, you're more likely to get neglible principles, little doing Agile (since they use pre-canned examples, not yours) and 90% on the framework.
 
Demand more.
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About the author | Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway is the founder and CEO of Net Objectives. With 45 years of experience, Al is an industry thought leader in Lean, Kanban, product portfolio management, Scrum and agile design. He helps companies transition to Lean and Agile methods enterprise-wide as well teaches courses in these areas.



        

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