It is Bimodal, but in a Different Manner (Part II)

April 13, 2016 — Posted by Israel Gat

I was not planning to write a series of posts on the subject, but as I got a number of inquiries on my first post, I would like to add a few words to elaborate on the subject.

We, as an industry, have gone through a few generations of computing that were characterized by form factor: mainframes, minicomputers, PC’s. The Cloud, IMHO, is the first generation of computing where the form factor became irrelevant.

Let me explain this statement. The form factor is, of course, very relevant to the good folks at AWS who makes the Cloud a reality. Likewise, it is quite relevant to CIO’s who still rely on their own proprietary computing resources (even if these resources are named “private cloud...”) For the rest of us, the form factor aspect has been reduced to the fairly meaningless question “is it 5.5 inches I prefer or will I choose a 6-inch device as my cellphone?”

With the form factor fading away as an important data center consideration for those CIO’s that shifted to the cloud, the career dilemma is brutally simple:

1.    Can I, as a CIO, add more value through focusing on all-encompassing issue, e.g. making certain that our data privacy policy satisfies regulatory compliance in (say) 99 countries all over the glove? or,

2.    Could I generate more value through implementing a leading edge Bayesian analytics application for business unit XYZ?

Beauty, of course, is in the eyes of the beholder. But, unless you are CIO with a significant private cloud “endowment,” your long-term options are truly limited…

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About the author | Israel Gat

Dr. Gat’s executive career spans top technology companies, he has led the development of products enabling companies to move toward next-generation system management technology. Dr. Gat is also well versed in growing smaller companies and has held advisory and venture capital positions for companies in new, high-growth markets. He was presented with an Innovator of the Year Award from Application Development Trends in 2006. Dr. Gat focuses his consulting and writing on technical debt, large-scale implementations of lean software methods and agile business service management (“devops”).



        

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