Addendum to How to Abandon Practices

May 19, 2015 — Posted by Al Shalloway

In our Day 3 of SAFeTM: Elaborating SAFeTM, the fourth webinar on Leanban, I discussed how to abandon practices.

Here were a couple of other tables of interest.  This relates to my earlier blog How to Abandon Practices.

Focus on Outcomes, Not Practices

Outcome to Achieve Scrum Kanban What to Do
Coordination with other teams Time-boxes all in synch Use cadence all in synch Use time-boxes or cadence
Intra-Team Collaboration Cross-functional teams Insufficient, requires attempting to create teams Create teams to the extent possible
Team in synch Daily standup Visual Control, daily standup Visual control, daily standup
Reality check Things not done at end of sprint are clear Cycle time. Insufficient, requires tracking size of stories Manage
Developer / tester relationship Skills, but not roles.End of sprint checkpoint Insufficient, ignores issue Time-boxing OR discipline with small storiesATDD highly recommended
Predictability of work done Estimation and velocityInsufficient if don’t manage WIP Insufficient, requires estimation Estimation and velocity, Manage interruptions, Reduce technical debt
Smooth transition Often insufficient if teams don’t exist prior to transition Can control rate of transition Use MBIs, create teams to the extent possible, sequence work, use ATDD
Reduce Technical Debt Use XP style technical practices Ignores Use test-first methods (ATDD/TDD), Continuous integration, Emergent Design
Finish stories quickly Time boxes, small stories Managing WIP helps. Still insufficient as may not break stories down small enough Time boxes OR discipline to complete stories quickly.  Decompose to small stories using <given> <when> <then> story format.
Minimal delays in workflow

Cross-functional Teams

Use small stories

Manage WIP

Cross-functional teams, Manage WIP

Use small stories

Short feedback cycles

Use small stories

Product owner and cross-functional teams

Manage WIP

Insufficient – requires discipline

Use small stories, Manage WIP

Product owner and cross-functional teams

Balanced workload Pull work based on velocity Manage WIP

Pull work based on velocity

Manage WIP

 

Practice What It Achieves Doing?
Explicit workflow Enables everyone to know what’s happening. Facilitates learning  
Daily standups Keeps people informed (often not needed if co-located)  
Make everything visible Facilitates learning and management. Detect challenges.  
Common cadence/sprints Enables early synchronization of different teams  
Build incrementally and iterate on the increments Short feedback cycles and learning  
Focus on finishing Avoid too much WIP, look for opportunities to collaborate  
Do continuous integration Detect out of synchronization errors  
Estimate work items and compute velocity (unless a maintenance group) Validates understanding of items being worked on by the teams. Facilitates planning.  
Work in small batches Faster feedback. Easier to avoid workflow delays. Enables people moving around as needed.  
Use small stories Faster feedback. Easier to avoid workflow delays. Enables people moving around as needed.  
Manage work in process (WIP) Eliminate delay, speed up feedback  
Create cross-functional teams to the extent possible Eliminate delay, speed up feedback, learn faster  
Use test-first methods Better understand what is needed, convey this better, improve collaboration between dev and test, facilitate automation of test  
Paired Programming Collaboration, shared knowledge of code base, increased discipline  

 

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About the author | Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway is the founder and CEO of Net Objectives. With over 40 years of experience, Alan is an industry thought leader in Lean, Kanban, product portfolio management, SAFe, Scrum and agile design.



        

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