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Know Thy Audience - Part 1

March 26, 2007 — Posted by Jim Trott

Listen to the podcast Know Thy Audience

Dwight Eisenhower said, “Planning is everything, the plan is nothing.” One of the critical success factors for introducing Lean-Agile software development into an organization is to be prepared. To understand who you are going to be working with: their motivations, experiences in development, world view, and their focus in development efforts. Who makes decisions and how are they made? The thought work you put into your planning now will help you create a plan that both helps you focus on the important things first and gives you a flexible framework for the future. The more you engage with the organization, the more you should expect to adjust your coaching plan: it will never be correct the first time out. Adjustment is completely acceptable in Lean-Agile. What is not acceptable is going in unprepared. Lean-Agile is not chaotic. It requires discipline and a framework to build on.

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Books to Read if You Want to do Technical Coaching

March 13, 2007 — Posted by Al Shalloway

Just thought I'd jot these down as they are the books I think anyone doing coaching must read:

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Is "Chicken and Pigs" Counter-Productive?

March 9, 2007 — Posted by Al Shalloway

I just completed our first public offering of our Agile Estimation and Analysis for Developers and Product Champions and had some interesting insights. As in all of our lean-agile courses, I talk about the structure within which the teams work. This is very often as important as the way the teams work. For example, most companies (especially IT ones) have people working on too many projects at once. This causes thrashing to occur at both the individual level.

If we can improve the blend/number of projects being worked on we can markedly improve the performance of the team.

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Lean and What do we do next? - Part 2

January 26, 2007 — Posted by Jim Trott

Listen to the podcast Lean and "So, what do we do next?" - Part 2

These Lean-Agile principles all seem reasonable, but abstract. What do we do to put it into practice? This is part 2 of a discussion on this.

OK. Root causes, Agile, Value Stream. What else?

I held this interview just after a challenging Lean-Agile Overview class. Midway through, the students seemed restless or frustrated. One of those times where you know you are just not getting through to them, that something is blocking the students’ ability to hear what you have to say. That happens sometimes and when it is a crowd of managers in the room, you know that no amount of pushing through the material is going to help. Taking a cue from the lean thinking principle to “stop the line” when something is going wrong, Alan Shalloway decided that the best thing was to stop the class and see what was going on.

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Lean and What do we do next? - Part 1

January 17, 2007 — Posted by Jim Trott

Listen to the podcast Lean and "So, what do we do next?" - Part 1

These Lean-Agile principles all seem reasonable, but abstract. What do we do to put it into practice?

The problem of thrashing

It has been one of those years this last month. Snow, holidays, and hospitals conspired to put me behind. So I have gotten really far behind and am slowly digging myself out. I suppose you could say to me, “Physician, heal thyself!” because I have gotten caught up in the multi-tasking / thrashing trap that we are going to talk about today. Has that ever happened to you? Where you have so much going on, so many tasks clamoring for your attention that you don’t know where to turn next? I think I am a good multi-tasker, so I was amazed at how behind I got. I decided to adopt the Lean-Agile technique of doing more by doing less at one time. My throughput has improved, even if it means I have not gotten some things – such as the blog and podcast – done according to schedule.

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Blog Authors

Al Shalloway
Business, Operations, Process, Sales, Agile Design and Patterns, Personal Development, Agile, Lean, SAFe, Kanban, Kanban Method, Scrum, Scrumban, XP
Cory Foy
Change Management, Innovation Games, Team Agility, Transitioning to Agile
Guy Beaver
Business and Strategy Development, Executive Management, Management, Operations, DevOps, Planning/Estimation, Change Management, Lean Implementation, Transitioning to Agile, Lean-Agile, Lean, SAFe, Kanban, Scrum
Israel Gat
Business and Strategy Development, DevOps, Lean Implementation, Agile, Lean, Kanban, Scrum
Jim Trott
Business and Strategy Development, Analysis and Design Methods, Change Management, Knowledge Management, Lean Implementation, Team Agility, Transitioning to Agile, Workflow, Technical Writing, Certifications, Coaching, Mentoring, Online Training, Professional Development, Agile, Lean-Agile, SAFe, Kanban
Ken Pugh
Agile Design and Patterns, Software Design, Design Patterns, C++, C#, Java, Technical Writing, TDD, ATDD, Certifications, Coaching, Mentoring, Professional Development, Agile, Lean-Agile, Lean, SAFe, Kanban, Kanban Method, Scrum, Scrumban, XP
Marc Danziger
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Max Guernsey
Analysis and Design Methods, Planning/Estimation, Database Agility, Design Patterns, TDD, TDD Databases, ATDD, Lean-Agile, Scrum
Scott Bain
Analysis and Design Methods, Agile Design and Patterns, Software Design, Design Patterns, Technical Writing, TDD, Coaching, Mentoring, Online Training, Professional Development, Agile
Steve Thomas
Business and Strategy Development, Change Management, Lean Implementation, Team Agility, Transitioning to Agile
Tom Grant
Business and Strategy Development, Executive Management, Management, DevOps, Analyst, Analysis and Design Methods, Planning/Estimation, Innovation Games, Lean Implementation, Agile, Lean-Agile, Lean, Kanban