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Database Agility

September 23, 2008 — Posted by Jim Trott

Listen to the podcast Database Agility

Databases are central to almost any software development project of any size. Developers have been gaining big improvements as they adopt Agile approaches: higher quality, more satisfaction, delivering more value to customers. It seems time for database developers to begin to experience the same gains!

But database development is special. It is not like just copying new bits into the environment. Databases need to retain their identity and the data that are in them. They have history and investment and must survive. Transitioning change is much harder and requires more care.

Is it possible to use iterative, Agile approaches with databases?

Yes it is. This podcast describes the landscape for doing so. Early adopters of this approach have learned the key principles involved and tools for testing and transition management are now available. Training is also available to equip teams with the new skills and ways of thinking that are required in order to be successful.

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Present and the Possible in Software Development

September 23, 2008 — Posted by Jim Trott

Listen to the podcast The Present and the Possible

There is a gap between what is possible and what is present - what is done - in the software industry. How much time and effort is wasted, how much re-inventing and re-discovery is done because we don't always understand the hard won insights from the past about what is required to create quality, sustainable product? How many companies have not realized the success of process improvements, like Agile, because they have not really understood its principles?

This gap, and the pain and waste it causes, is frustrating. Closing the gap involves a little re-orientation, becoming intentional to learn and try and adjust, to improve continually. To become more professional.

Professionals strive to build on the learnings of others. They avoid taking unnecessary shortcuts, especially when that could harm the product over the long term (imagine what would happen to the civil engineer who kludges together something for the last 2 feet of a bridge just to get it finished up or just to try some new, cool idea). They follow the best practices in how we develop and manage people, in the processes and methods we use, and in the proper way to use tools and technologies. 

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The Importance of Paradigms (Beliefs)

September 12, 2008 — Posted by Al Shalloway

I have been seeing more and more the importance of paradigms in guiding software development.  I am even including a chapter on it in our upcoming book: Lean-Agile Software Development: Achieving Enterprise Agility

What is a paradigm? It is the set of experiences, beliefs, and values that affect the way you perceive what is real and how you should react. A paradigm is a habit of reasoning. Your world view.

A paradigm is deeply held and you may not always be aware of it. For example, when you were learning how to drive, you learned which side of the road was the "correct" side. It affects every aspect of how you drive, where you look for threats, and even how you cross the street. You do it without even thinking. Doesn't mean it is right, but it is "real." If you have ever travelled to another country where they drive on the "wrong" side (note the value judgment!), it probably took you a long time to adjust your way of seeing, in spite of lots of evidence to the contrary.

Because paradigms affect our view of what is real and true, we are slow to change them.

Why am I talking about this in a software development blog? Because the paradigms we developers hold affect our behavior as developers. And if we are going to grow and improve as developers, we have to become conscious of the paradigms that keep us in place. 

In other words, we should always be investigating our beliefs as developers. 

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Avoiding Over- and Under-Design in Agile Projects (Webinar)

August 20, 2008 — Posted by Jim Trott

Listen to the webinar audio Avoiding Over- and Under-Design in Agile Projects (audio of the webinar)

Scrum# is an extension to Scrum that was developed by Net Objectives to solve challenges that were being encountered by many teams adopting Scrum. Read about more about the issues which Scrum# was created to solve.

webinar on August 18, 2008 presented by Alan Shalloway focuses on what developers must attend to when building systems with Agile methods. It discusses an alternative to the choices of:

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Managing Requirements in Agile Projects with Scrum Sharp (Webinar)

August 20, 2008 — Posted by Jim Trott

Listen to the webinar audio Managing Requirements in Agile Projects with Scrum Sharp (audio of the webinar)

Scrum# is an extension to Scrum that was developed by Net Objectives to solve challenges that were being encountered by many teams adopting Scrum. Read about more about the issues which Scrum# was created to solve.

webinar on August 18, 2008 presented by Alan Shalloway discusses how Scrum#'s enterprise and product focus improves on the standard method of managing with Epics and User Stories. By stepping back to include product portfolio management, Scrum# facilitates working on the right product features across the enterprise, not just working on the right stories in a project. Topics discussed include:

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Blog Authors

Al Shalloway
Business, Operations, Process, Sales, Agile Design and Patterns, Personal Development, Agile, Lean, SAFe, Kanban, Kanban Method, Scrum, Scrumban, XP
Cory Foy
Change Management, Innovation Games, Team Agility, Transitioning to Agile
Guy Beaver
Business and Strategy Development, Executive Management, Management, Operations, DevOps, Planning/Estimation, Change Management, Lean Implementation, Transitioning to Agile, Lean-Agile, Lean, SAFe, Kanban, Scrum
Israel Gat
Business and Strategy Development, DevOps, Lean Implementation, Agile, Lean, Kanban, Scrum
Jim Trott
Business and Strategy Development, Analysis and Design Methods, Change Management, Knowledge Management, Lean Implementation, Team Agility, Transitioning to Agile, Workflow, Technical Writing, Certifications, Coaching, Mentoring, Online Training, Professional Development, Agile, Lean-Agile, SAFe, Kanban
Ken Pugh
Agile Design and Patterns, Software Design, Design Patterns, C++, C#, Java, Technical Writing, TDD, ATDD, Certifications, Coaching, Mentoring, Professional Development, Agile, Lean-Agile, Lean, SAFe, Kanban, Kanban Method, Scrum, Scrumban, XP
Marc Danziger
Business and Strategy Development, Change Management, Team Agility, Online Communities, Promotional Initiatives, Sales and Marketing Collateral
Max Guernsey
Analysis and Design Methods, Planning/Estimation, Database Agility, Design Patterns, TDD, TDD Databases, ATDD, Lean-Agile, Scrum
Scott Bain
Analysis and Design Methods, Agile Design and Patterns, Software Design, Design Patterns, Technical Writing, TDD, Coaching, Mentoring, Online Training, Professional Development, Agile
Steve Thomas
Business and Strategy Development, Change Management, Lean Implementation, Team Agility, Transitioning to Agile
Tom Grant
Business and Strategy Development, Executive Management, Management, DevOps, Analyst, Analysis and Design Methods, Planning/Estimation, Innovation Games, Lean Implementation, Agile, Lean-Agile, Lean, Kanban