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4 Things You Must Do At Scale

March 28, 2017 — Posted by Al Shalloway

This blog covers some of the ideas in the first session of our upcoming webinar series on Tuning SAFe. It's actually an adaptation of our Lean-Agile experience into the SAFe model so it will be useful for anyone attempting or doing Agile at scale.

The first session, called 'Rationale of SAFe', discusses the four key elements of an Agile transformation. These four issues must be dealt with regardless of the approach you take:

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Blog Series: TDD and Process Part I

March 7, 2017 — Posted by Scott Bain

Part 1: The False Dichotomy

Traditions in software testing suggest that the balance among the various types of test types (Acceptance, API, Integration, Unit) should be weighted toward the lower-level, more granular tests and less toward the larger-scale, or end-to-end tests.  The visualization is typically something along these lines, in terms of the effort that should be devoted to each:

The Test Pyramid

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Agile Pixie Dust

March 7, 2017 — Posted by Steve Thomas

You know the history well. At an executive level, the organization has decided to "go Agile". Everyone in the organization attended a 1/2 day Scrum Training course. The project managers were re-titled as "Scrum Masters" and the business analysts were re-labeled "Product Owners". Finally, the developers and testers were reorganized into a set of Scrum Teams and "Sprint Zero" was started. Since that time, the teams have been "Scrumming".

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Why Agile Should Be More Predictable Than Waterfall

March 5, 2017 — Posted by Al Shalloway

Many executives have been led to believe that Agile is inherently less predictable than a waterfall approach.  However, Agile, when wrapped in Lean-Thinking, can be more predictable because it enables working directly on the true causes of unpredictability in software development.  Waterfall’s large projects and stage gate approach cause delays in feedback, workflow, testing and integration.  These delays inherently create a significant amount of rework (redoing requirements, reworking code that missed requirements, finding bugs, thrashing during integration).  This work, of course, is never planned for, hence the bad estimates.  When the projects are de-scoped to meet time constraints, many of the less important features have already been done.  This means a lower number of features are delivered and many of these were not of the highest value.    

The key to having predictable results is to eliminate delay-induced work.  This requires smaller batches of work that are properly sequenced in importance, properly formed teams (or groups of teams) and solid technical practices.  Agile suggests additional methods such as Acceptance Test-Driven Development, automated testing and continuous integration.  These directly improve understanding of requirements (through quick feedback), code quality and risk reduction.

Although waterfall and Agile approaches have different mindsets, some of Agile’s methods can be incorporated into a waterfall. For example, making both projects and planning cycles shorter.  Improving methods will not make an organization Agile, but it may help set the stage for a true transformation.

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Re-Thinking “Eliminate Waste” and “Last Responsible Moment”

February 25, 2017 — Posted by Al Shalloway

Re-Thinking “Eliminate Waste”

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Blog Authors

Al Shalloway
Business, Operations, Process, Sales, Agile Design and Patterns, Personal Development, Agile, Lean, SAFe, Kanban, Kanban Method, Scrum, Scrumban, XP
Cory Foy
Change Management, Innovation Games, Team Agility, Transitioning to Agile
Guy Beaver
Business and Strategy Development, Executive Management, Management, Operations, DevOps, Planning/Estimation, Change Management, Lean Implementation, Transitioning to Agile, Lean-Agile, Lean, SAFe, Kanban, Scrum
Israel Gat
Business and Strategy Development, DevOps, Lean Implementation, Agile, Lean, Kanban, Scrum
Jim Trott
Business and Strategy Development, Analysis and Design Methods, Change Management, Knowledge Management, Lean Implementation, Team Agility, Transitioning to Agile, Workflow, Technical Writing, Certifications, Coaching, Mentoring, Online Training, Professional Development, Agile, Lean-Agile, SAFe, Kanban
Ken Pugh
Agile Design and Patterns, Software Design, Design Patterns, C++, C#, Java, Technical Writing, TDD, ATDD, Certifications, Coaching, Mentoring, Professional Development, Agile, Lean-Agile, Lean, SAFe, Kanban, Kanban Method, Scrum, Scrumban, XP
Marc Danziger
Business and Strategy Development, Change Management, Team Agility, Online Communities, Promotional Initiatives, Sales and Marketing Collateral
Max Guernsey
Analysis and Design Methods, Planning/Estimation, Database Agility, Design Patterns, TDD, TDD Databases, ATDD, Lean-Agile, Scrum
Scott Bain
Analysis and Design Methods, Agile Design and Patterns, Software Design, Design Patterns, Technical Writing, TDD, Coaching, Mentoring, Online Training, Professional Development, Agile
Steve Thomas
Business and Strategy Development, Change Management, Lean Implementation, Team Agility, Transitioning to Agile
Tom Grant
Business and Strategy Development, Executive Management, Management, DevOps, Analyst, Analysis and Design Methods, Planning/Estimation, Innovation Games, Lean Implementation, Agile, Lean-Agile, Lean, Kanban